Saturday, April 7, 2012

Chrissie Wellington

Chrissie Wellington



Here is the link to a good article on Chrissie Wellington, the women's world record holder in the Ironman.  Her world record time is 32 minutes faster than the previous record that stood for 14 years. At one point, Chrissie struggled with an eating disorder. Her new book, "A Life Without Limits", details her battle with both anorexia and bulimia. She overcame other hurdles in her life as well in order to become one of the most accomplished female triathletes the world has known.

7 comments:

  1. I had no idea she dealt with anorexia and bulimia. When I see professional athletes that have had issues with weight and food at one point in their lives, it just makes them become more human to me. I like when they speak out. Thank you for posting this.

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  2. I agree. It's such an inspiration to see people overcome such terrible obstacles in their lives.

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  3. Good article. Amazing athlete - 8:18 is incredibly fast, as is 2:44 for a marathon leg of an IM. Not sure about her idea of having a year or two 'off' before attempting a fast marathon at London. Six weeks off and then begin again as a runner maybe, but I'll be happy to be proven wrong.

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  4. Ok, I actually agree with her taking the year or so "off". I basically took a year off of any "hard" running to have my daughter and now I feel like I'm a completely different runner...and I finally got over my hip injury. It's sometimes necessary. I think she knows..

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  5. I think it all depends on how people define "off" in these matters. You have a good point that taking time away from any hard training can be helpful. I don't think any kind of couch to marathon in a day plan would work, obviously. I think you are right, Meggan, sometimes one has to do what's best for the body and allow for down time in order to be at full capacity down the road. In the article I wrote on Suzy, this was one of the points she stressed most. Don't get caught up in the race ahead, focus only on doing what it takes to be at 100 percent again.

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    1. Yes, "off" to her, being used to training 6+ hours a day, could be running once a day for an hour. At her age, having two years of no exercise then starting a 2:20-25 marathon plan at 36 seems strange.

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  6. The article is a little confusing, because she talks both about taking a year or two off while talking about running the marathon in 2:20. I'm starting to think she meant take time off training for the triathlon specifically, but it's not clearly written.

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